Wurlitzer Electric Piano models: a list.

I began this page in July 2014.  I’d realized there was no one page on the internet that listed every Wurlitzer Electronic Piano model, its years made, and its basic, differentiating features.  Well, now: Here it is.

I hope others find this helpful and can help me make the dates and data even more accurate and specific.  Please scroll down below the chart for a recent epiphany on ways you can far more accurately approximate the date of your Wurli’s assembly.

I tune and regulate these pianos.  I make house calls in greater New York City, including parts of Long Island.  I don’t check this site often.  It is best to call me:  347-374-0428.

Click: Wurlitzer Tuning, Regulation & Repair
New: Testimonals from satisfied customers

The list is followed by some important notes about reed styles, and other clarifications.

Hint: Select 10 entries per page in dropdown for ease in navigating. The table is wide, and has some inadvertently hidden columns that you will see if you select text and drag to the right.

#ModelEarliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
Notes
(scroll or click/drag text to right for additional/hidden columns-->)
Reed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
(scroll
for more columns-->)
SpeakersModelSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
#ModelEarliest
confirmed
date
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
ColorsSpeakersModelSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
01950s1950s:
110019541954PortableExtremely rare, perhaps a prototype or the model placed in test markets. Not mentioned in most Wurlitzer literature--not even in the "reed compatibility" memos. Photo shows wrought iron legs (dif from those on 110) and a music stand that spans the whole instrument and attaches on the sides. (does this double as a carrying handle?) Is there a damper pedal? I'm guessing not.1 (?)tubenBrown pebble-textured finish (guess)1 6" x 9" oval100ep-forum
21101954-12
(Fred DiLeone)
1955PortableWood & Brooks Action. This model seems to be quite rare; may have been replaced with the 111 within months. Manual exists, less rare than the keyboard as they continued using it, inappropriately, for the 111. "The 110 slides out of the case for servicing, as the top is fixed. The handle is also on the back, so the keys point down when carried as a suitcase." [Fred DiLeone, EP Forum] "Auxiliary pedal" mentioned only in action-removing instructions of manual, seemingly an afterthought (p.8); Some pix, not all, showing a right-side hole where it would go. The lead treble sustain brick of later 1950s models is not found here, though other smaller weights are attached at various spots. [says Fred, true of some 111's too.] Piano sits on a table with wrought-iron legs. Chair, w similar legs, matches table.1tuben"Brown pebble-textured finish" (Owosso Argus Press, June 28, 1955) "Pebblelac finish" (Manual, p. 15).1 6" x 9" oval1101164 (only known number)1164 (only known number)2001200photo
ep-forum
ep forum
31111955-03
[Fred DiLeone]
1955PortableWood & Brooks Action. Much more common than the 110, as several have shown up for sale recently. The body has changed, and now the action is accessible from the top, instead of sliding out the front. Apparently has no manual: One original owner was given a 110 manual instead (which confused him given the changes in accessing the works). Reed screws are under damper action and hard to access (true of all 1950s models). "The 111 is essentially a 112, with the 110 amplifier." [Fred DiLeone, EP forum] The lead treble sustain brick of later 1950s models is found on some of these- not all of them, and not sequentially by serial number. Still sits on table with wrought iron legs, matching bench. Er....sometimes, though some have screw-in legs like the 112. A lot of variety for such a short-production instrument.

Pedal mounts on side, also in 112; this is a terrible design. Unlike the later, bottom-mounting ones, these pedals are rare! Don't throw them out or repurpose them--that would be tragic.
1tubenBrown pebble-textured finish 1 6" x 9" oval11112981377 (May 11 1955),
1439 (May 25, 1955)
1503 (March 55, no sustain brick)
4002900EP Forum

EP Forum
41121955-06-02
(schematic)
1956 (mid year?)PortableWood and Brooks Action. 112 is frequently claimed to be 1st model produced in greater quantity. Perhaps; although several 111's have shown up, recently. A heavy lead brick, bolted over top 8 reed screws for improved sustain, is not shown in manual, but exists on instruments by at least March 1956. (As it is on some 111's, may be on all of 112's). No dampers on those 8 notes. Wooden legs attach to instrument.

See note on side-mounted pedal in model 111.

Reed screws are not interchangeable with post-1956 reed screws. Different gauge, different design. Washers are separate from screw, and their positioning can impact the tuning, especially if reed tip is facing up. This can be an advantage or disadvantage.

112's, and the 2 earlier variants, are a royal pain to service (tuning and regulation). The company simply wasn't yet designing these with ongoing maintenance in mind, and as a result, everything takes 4 to 6 times longer to repair. As with all 1950's-era models, this should be a consideration before investing in one. Of course, they are fantastic once they have been serviced. They will never have the feel of a post-1961 model, and this should not be expected of them. The conception is far more primitive. The sound and feel are unique, though, and this can be appealing.
1tubenSandstone
beige (lighter than 111)
1 6" x 9" oval1121331 (!! This is in the middle of the 111 serial numbers...leftover plate?), next known is 41005472
6198, 6609 (Mar 23, 1956), 7763 (!! Later than all known 112A numbers.)
26095700http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=7900.0

http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=7084.5;wap2

http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
5112AJune 1956 (reed bar stamped "L," slightly different from March '56 112, may be 112A); 1956-10-19
(note #7)
1956PortablePratt-Read Action. A radical physical revision, which deserved more than the mere "A" appended to its model number. Pedal mounts not on right side, but on bottom, behind middle E and F, for the first time. These and 120 series are arguably even more complex/ difficult to regulate than earlier actions. (See more detail on this in 120 entry).

In short, this is a briefly available hybrid of the 112 (amp, reeds, basic look of the exterior) and the upcoming 120 (same pedal, and similar, not same, action). Lead sustain brick still covers top 8 notes, instead of the 11 notes of the upcoming 120, so this action has three more dampers than the 120.

They didn't bother making a manual for it, even though its significant changes warranted one; they just inserted a couple of new pages into the 112 manual.

According to Fred DiLeone, the key sticks are longer than on a 120, with a stop at the back to prevent them from bouncing up. They are also different from the 112 keys. Through trading photos, we compared reed bars with a 112. They matched one of the 112 reed bar variants (from early in 1956, as opposed to the mid-year version....strangely).

As I've never heard one played, I wonder: Is the strike-line of the hammers here different than on the 120, to take into account the different reeds? (If you put a lower register 120 reed in a 112, it doesn't do so well: Hammers "thud" in an nodal spot, and presumably vice versa.) Or, did they change the specs on the 120 reed bar and reeds because this setup wasn't working so well?

The serial numbers are interspersed with known 112 numbers, in both the 6000 and 7000 ranges. It begs the question: Were these models being produced at the same time? Or were there odd gaps in the 112 serial number ranges, which the 112A filled in? And why the "P" designation at the end of some serial numbers? For "Pratt Read"?
1tubenSandstone
beige
1 6" x 9" oval112A6227? (Reported by an ebay seller. Lower than a known 112 number. Numbers may not be sequential).7006P, 7200P4001300http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=7900.0 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/topics/11874 https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/messages/11892
6120Very late 1956? 1957-01-16 (seen on masking tape on reed bar in serial #10036; 1957-5-21 (Wurlitzer note #9) 1961- mid-'62PortablePhotographic evidence suggests this is the Wurli Ray Charles used on 1959 hit "What'd I Say." Specifically, one of the 1958 variants with a Rorschach-blot/jigsaw look to the music stand. (Early ones have a "picket fence" style music stand.)

Pratt-Read Action. All Pratt-Read Wurly actions (in this, the prior 112A, and the 700) are notably different in feel from earlier and later Wurlitzers. No springs except for damper arms. They feel lighter: More like an organ keyboard. Regulating action ("feel") requires a special tool. Black keys are further regulated with a set screw under the key. All technicians agree that these are a nightmare to maintain and restore, even though the results can be magic.

First major revision of reeds. Lead sustain brick now covers top 11 notes (two blocks, 3+8 notes, on early ones).

Lid of the 120 is metal instead of wood (a built-in hum shield). Some have same whip assembly as 112A, but design revised in 1959 [Vintage Vibe]. Damper mounting bracket changes later in run; at first it is identical to 112A [Max Brink]. Amp and cabinet different from 112A. Volume control moves to left cheek block.

On a very early one (Jan 1957), low damper arms have heavy springs, switching to successively lighter gauges starting around middle C. Later ones seem to have all light-springed dampers.

We might assume that around 14500 of the 120 plus 700 were produced, between late 1956 and 1961-2. This would imply a production of roughly 3000 units per year, or 250 units per month. They are (or were, depending on how many survive) the most common of the 1950's models.

No instruments are showing up between serial #'s 11000 and 12985 (a model 700), but from dates of existing instruments, they are probably out there. Even less certain about instruments existing between 23001 and 25001. It looks like different finishes had allotments of serial numbers (for example, Brown Mahogany may start around 10501), and it is not yet known if this means the serial numbers are out of production order.
2tubenSandstone
beige,
blue/cream, Brown Mahogany,
black (?)
1 6" x 9" oval1208056 (ebay auction), 8215 (ebay auction),
10531 (Brown Mahogany)
22728http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=7900.0 http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
77001958-06-16
(Life Mag ad: "Steve Allen Plays the Fun Piano")
1961-mid '62Console,
wooden,
w/ soft pedal
Pratt-Read Action. "Furniture" console version of 120. Soft pedals in this and the later three 700-series models are electronic, on/off, not mechanical.2tubenBrown
Mahogany
1 12" round70012985, 15818, 17352, 1766818679http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
7.1Pre-200
1960s
Earliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
SpeakersPre-200
1960s
Serial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
8140First manufactured between April and July 1962. First known ad is Nov. 3, 1962, New Yorker, so maybe they appeared in stores then. 1962-04-01
(action schematic);
Series 2 PC board is 1962-07-10 (serial 25001).
No earlier than 1961-03-14 (US patent 2,974,555 on faceplate), but almost certainly later. #25149's atypical, cryptic stamps may indicate May 7 to July 9 assembly. #25776 is date-stamped August 8, 1962.
1963, early-late? Finished by October, maybe earlier.PortableSolid State amp version of simultaneously released 145 (below).

It's as if, after 7 years of production, it had finally occurred to the designers that these instruments would need ongoing tuning and maintenance; and that they should rethink the instrument to make that process relatively efficient.

The action has been entirely redesigned, and resembles neither the 110-112 conception, nor the 112A-120 conception. They'd arrived at a good, workable idea here, and they would stick with it, only slightly revised, throughout the entire rest of the production run of Wurlitzer Electric Pianos.

Vibrato is introduced. Reeds attached 180° from prior models: Reed screws are now below the front end of damper arms, far more accessible for tuning and replacement. Damper arms are long, covering reed screws, which is still an inconvenience. Top 11 notes are still damper-free as in 120, but it appears that the treble sustain brick that had gone here in prior series was retired by this time. Reeds are compatible with 120 series except for unique bass register; only true for these three, briefly-produced models (no A or B in model names). Volume/Vibrato controls on top assembly (front of lid).

Reed screws are shorter than in 120 series. (5/16 instead of 7/16 inches.)

For the first time, range is split between two 32-note reed bars. The need for a sustain brick appears to have been negated by adding overhanging mass to isosceles trapezoidal wedges at fronts of reed bars. Again, this will be retained, going forward.

The 140, 140A, and only the earliest 140B's had an optional battery pack (see item 940 at bottom of the chart). This makes these the only Wurlitzer that didn't require a wall outlet until the very rare 200B in the early 1980s.

These 3 models of 1962-3 pre-A's may have have a total production of no more than 4000, split between the three models (based on serial numbers).

I have not yet encountered any of the three models in this series that had original reeds and amp entirely intact. I have a hunch I have heard them though: Is this the Wurlitzer heard on the Seeds' "Pushing Too Hard," and Bob Dylan's song "Highway 61"? If so, I would say that the combination of the 120-style reeds and the drastically-changed action resulted in an especially quirky, reedy sound, perhaps with a short decay. This may be why the reeds were redesigned for the next run.
3solid
state
ySandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval
(4 ohm)
14025001 (earliest?),
25149 (an existing instrument)
26048http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
9145Release could be Nov. 1962, as above. Or, between April and July 1962, as above. 1963, early-late? Finished by October, maybe earlier.PortableTube amp version of 140 (above). See 145B (below) for discussion of 145-series amps.3tubeySandstone beige 1 6"x9" oval
(4 ohm)
14530177 (earliest? 4-15-1965 issue 3 amp schematic), 30534 (known)30856
10720Release could be Nov. 1962, as above. Or, between April and July 1962, as above. 1963, early-late? Finished by October, maybe earlier.Console,
wooden,
w/ soft pedal
Console version of 145 (uses same tube amp). Controls on cheek block. Electronic soft pedal.3tubeyBrown
Mahogany
1 12" round
(4 ohm)
72040001 (guess), 40095 (known),
40221 (known)
40401 (by Jan 1963)
11140A1963, mid-late? By October, maybe earlier.

A 720A (with "A" embossed, as if an afterthought), has keybed/keys date-stamped ranging from Oct 1962 to Feb 1963. But main rail has date-stamp of Oct 1963. I suspect, as with "B" line, that earliest ones were half- assembled in prior era, then revised at the last minute.
1964, March-April (production); August, or beyond. (distribution)

Argument for March: Late 145A has March 7 date stamp on keys, and an early 145B, from 164 serial numbers later, has an April 28 date stamp. (However, that March 145A may have been completed later in year--main rail not checked.)

Argument for August or later:
Note #17 about "Reed Interchangeability," from August 17, 1964, doesn't acknowledge B's existence. Transition moment to "B" line is slightly unclear: Were early 140B's, with April 1964 date stamps, merely A's that had been retrofitted with different amps? Some reports suggest early B's had same reed screw problem.

PortableModels in this uncommon "A" series have the potential to play as well as in the classic "B" series. But there was a serious, correctable flaw, which must be addressed in any decent servicing. Read carefully.

These are often misidentified as "140" (no "A") because the "A" in serial plate can be an added, very light stamp. Damper arms are still long, but only top 5 notes are damper-less-- this is a surefire quick way to identify. (Same goes for 145A, 720A).

Major change is in reed, to proto-200. Reeds above #20 have upward-facing tips for the first time. Does hammer position/ action change? (New reeds imply changed strike line and/or reed bar/ pickups; or, if action doesn't change here, reeds were perhaps redesigned to accommodate presumed disappointment of 120-compatible reeds in prior model). This series and 145B seem "disappeared" from later Wurlitzer manuals and catalogs, but certainly exist. No major change in amp from prior 140 series--same name to amp. Five mysterious 4th-octave reed screw plates, perhaps for sustain (or for taming overtones?), debut here and are retained into the 1970's models.

Reed screw washers had buzzing and cracking problem, addressed in an August 1964 memo. (Tightening these screws lowers pitch--screws were revamped in B series). These screws should be replaced as a matter of course during any modern tuning or repair. They are terrifying. Notes will not hold pitch or sustain correctly unless screws and washers are replaced.

One might guess, from the serial number evidence, that 3000 or so of the A's were assembled, split between the 3 models (140A, 145A, 720A).

This model carried over battery pack option from 140.
4solid
state
ySandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval140A2645027375http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
12145A1963, mid-late? By October, maybe earlier. See note in 140A.1964, March-April (production); August, or beyond. (distribution). (See 140A)PortableTube amp version of 140A, with reed changes and reed screw problems as above. Amp is still called "145" (no A). See 145B (below) for discussion of 145 series amps. See above (140A) for many non-amp details that apply to this model.4tubeySandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval145A3129932034http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=8529.msg47624#msg47624
13720A1963, mid-late? By October, maybe earlier. See note in 140A.1964, March-April (production); August, or beyond. (distribution). (See 140A)Console,
wooden,
w/ soft pedal
Console version of 145A--the final console model with a tube amp ("145"), with a larger speaker than its solid-state successor (the 720B). Controls on cheek block. Electronic soft pedal. Reed/action changes and reed screw problems as in 140A, above.4tubeyBrown
Mahogany
1 12" round
(4 ohm)
720A4058641595http://www.miloco.co.uk/2014/incredibly-rare-wurlitzer-720a-and-other-new-toys-at-lion-aboard/
14140BFirst sold sometime after August 17, 1964, and by December 1964. "Reed compatibility" note #17 of August 17 doesn't mention the B line. Date stamp of April 28 is on one of first 150 of the 145B's produced--this one was sold in December 1964. I theorize, though, that this began life as a half-assembled "A", and was revised in mid-production and completed late in year.Mid-1968 (assumed.)
or 1974-03-01
(Schematic
update.
Curiously
late! typo for 1964?)
PortableKnob controls on cheek block (vs. lid front) of portables, are only on B series--makes easy to identify. Shortly after this series is introduced, damper arms are revised to ~3/4 inch shorter, not overhanging the reed screws, making tuning much easier.* Most-documented/ promoted change in this B series, from evidence of manual, is the silicone and geranium transistor amplifier of the solid state models, quite distinct from geranium transistor 140/140A amp. The June 1966 schematic is apparently a revision; B series were being manufactured by late April 1964 (unless early examples are "A" models retrofitted with improvements?), and in stores by December '64 at the latest.

Eventually, reeds screws are vastly improved: shiny, stronger, with thick concave washers. This change is kept for all later models. Early ones seem similar to early 140 reed screws. Mid-period screws are still dull-looking, with a different letter marking on the top than the "R" on the "classic" reed screws that were used for the next 17 years.

*(But exact changeover point may be inconsistent/random, and B-series instruments exist with A-style long damper arms and, in a couple known cases, knob locations, too [say Chicago EP Co., and Retrolinear]. Maybe even those bad cracking reed screws. #27895 (and early 145Bs including #32253) have long damper arms but cheek-block knob location.)

#27895, very early, has battery pack jack in 140B amp. By #29808, this feature is gone from back "phono" panel of amp, and electronic part numbers are different on amp ("11-xxxx" instead of "65xxxx").
4solid
state
ySandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval
(8 ohm)
140B27501 (Earliest? 3/74 PC Board diagram), 27895 (known instrument),
29091 (June 1966 schematic, perhaps a revision, perhaps a misprint)
34614, 38598. A number of 32380 was perceived on an Ebay listing, but would be smack dab in the middle of the 145B range....could be a bad photo.http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=7900.msg42288
15
145BFirst sold sometime after August 17, 1964, but by December 1964. See note in 140B.Mid-1968 (assumed.)
1972-4? (questionable.)
PortableFinal tube amp model, with parallel physical changes to 140B's (usually short dampers and moved control knobs. Eventually, improved reed screws and washers). Unclear whether gradual changes throughout 145 amps correspond to model names, but probably not. Unlike 140B counterpart, this tube amp is always just called "145" (no A or B). We know the 145 amp had a 3rd issue by April 1965, but B series debuts 1964. As with the prior "A" series, this model disappeared from Wurly lit except for reed memo. Does this imply minimal changes? Doesn't quite make sense. "Made in small numbers til 1972-4" (says Sound and Circuit site, but this is questionable--evidence needed).

Based on testimony of repair people, the very earliest 145B's may be indistinguishable from 145A's. Same long damper arms and/or knobs on lid and/or cracked reed screw problems. It's not bad to check for these traits before buying one.
4tubeySandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval
(8 ohm)
145B32253 (Skip Freese),
32339 (seen on Ebay, Oct 2015)
33429http://soundandcircuit.webs.com/wurlitzerelectricpianos.htm http://www.vintagevibe.com/service-center/wurlitzer-manuals-and-tech-tips/
16720BFirst sold sometime after August 17, 1964, but by December 1964. See note in 140B.
^^^^^^^^^^
Mid-1968 (assumed.)Console,
wooden,
w/ soft pedal
Console version of 140B with similarly redesigned amp. Unlike tube 720 and 720A, this is a solid state console (the first). Electronic soft pedal. Speaker is much smaller than in 720A.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
4solid
state
yBrown
Mahogany
1 6" x 9" oval
(8 ohm) [yes, smaller than 720 speaker.]
720B4224642246https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/messages/6229
16.1NOTE on B Series:->->->* *Thanks to Skip Freese, owner of 145B #32253, we have moved the in-store date of the B series to late 1964, and its production debut to April 1964. "In December of 1964 I bought a new Wurlitzer model 145B at Grinnell Bros music store in Detroit." This one has long damper arms and thinner reed washers (same type as on the 140A's? Or 140's?).

Wurlitzer EP Note #17, about reed compatibility, came out August 17, 1964, and didn't mention the B series. So, in spite of an April 28 date stamp on Skip's keys, we can assume these didn't hit stores until sometime between September and December.

Hard to tell how many B-model instruments were were produced, in their various flavors. Probably far more than the pre-A and A versions. Could be as high as 9000, could be 6200, could be far less.

Are there gaps in serial numbers? Unknown. Looks like "A" and "B" numberings pick up from their pre-A numberings, and eventually 140B, 146B and 145B numberings share the 30000 range and possibly intermix (vague data). Perhaps there is a leap between late 140B "38xxx" numbers (circa 1968) and the block of "40xxx" numbers first designated for the 1962 consoles. The 200 series seems to pick up around "49xxx," and there are probably some gaps in the 40000's prior to that.
16.2
Pre-200
Music Lab Models
Earliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
SpeakersPre-200
Music Lab Models
Serial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
17146B (see also 146, below)1966-06 (date stamp)
or earlier; maybe even later 1964.
1967, pre-OctoberPortable, StudentThe "6" in the model number sets a precedent retained with the later 206 and 206A; they are all functionally similar variants on models ending in "0".

It appears this solid-state student model, designed/wired to be connected/monitored in series of up to 6 identical instruments by a teacher (or possibly, as with the 206/207, 4 groups of up to 6, for a total of 24 instruments), debuted with or after the 140B, and hence originally came with the "B" designation to make its lineage clear. (It appears there is no 146A, for example.) Other than this monitor wiring, it is indeed the same as a 140B, and uses the 140B amp. Confusingly, it appears that the 146 (w/ no "B") is later; date stamps and serial numbers both suggest this. I believe the 146B and the 146 are essentially the same model, for all modern-usage intents and purposes. Perhaps some aspect of the student/teacher circuitry is different...or not. Dropping the B might have been almost arbitrary. (It could have been changed to avoid confusion with an unrelated 146-B Band Organ that Wurlitzer sold in the 1920s.)

First dating is difficult!! October 8, 1962 newspaper evidence of piano teacher Faye Templeton Frisch traveling using Wurlitzer teacher+multi-student headphone monitoring set-up (clearly a prototype, no known model number); and a March 1968 article describing Professor Lawrence Rast's Kansas City, U of Missouri lab usage 1964-66 (was 1964 a prototype, or its initial release?). Includes vibrato circuit, not hooked up. Unverified reports of tube amp versions (very unlikely, unless it is the prototype).

I have created a separate line for the 146B and the later 146, as they seem to have distinct date and serial number ranges. But only the 146 (no B) is mentioned, rarely, in Wurlitzer literature.

Cinnamonrolli owns a 146B (confirmed). The serial number of this example is sandwiched between a couple of known 140B serial number ranges, but with a current margin of at least 1000 numbers on each side. Numbering could have started at 35001 or 35501? Hunches, awaiting more data.
4solid
state
n*Sandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval146B35629 (only known serial number, so far)35629 (only known serial number, so far)https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/messages/6229
17.11461967-10-16
or earlier (date stamps, note #20).
1968,
early
Portable, StudentThis may be essentially the same model as the 146B. See explanation, above. Did serial number start at 46001? A hunch.4solid
state
n*Sandstone beige 1 6" x 9" oval14646001 (hunch), 46360 (known)46874https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/messages/6229
18147, (147B?)1967-10-16
or earlier (see 146)
1968,
early
Portable, TeacherTeacher version of 146, reported online only, witnessed at a concert. Is there a 147B? No evidence, pure conjecture. Is not mentioned in any known Wurlitzer memos.4solid
state?
n*Sandstone beige (guess)1 6" x 9" oval147, (147B?)https://beta.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/topics/11234
19726
(no B?),
726B,
(727?)
1967-10-16
or earlier (note #20) (see 146)
1968,
early
Wood Console, student, soft pedal (assumption)Wooden console. 726 listed in the 1971 reed "note #17", but the only ones people are claiming to own are 726Bs. Given the witnessed, otherwise undocumented 147 (above), is there an entirely undocumented 727 teacher model? It would logically follow. Be on the lookout! The mention of model 746 once in note #20 (Oct 16, 1967) is almost certainly a typo; they meant 726, as elsewhere in that note. Presumably has electronic soft pedal.

Note #20 seems to indicate that model 726 has the same "student" functionality and wiring as the 146.
4solid
state
n*Brown Mahogany1 12" round726 (no B?),
726B,
(727?)
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Wurlitzer_Elec_Piano/conversations/messages/6229
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
19.1200 series (US)Earliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
Notes

NOTE: See later in table for Early 1970s German Variants (the 201 and the 300)
Reed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
Speakers200 seriesSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
202001968-09-01
(schematic);
June 17, 1968 (keybed datestamp of #49387, though electronics -european-- are from Sept-Oct '68.)
Late 1974 (September 14 known)Professional PortableThis series marks the single biggest change in the look of Wurlitzer's Electronic Pianos, which is retained throughout the rest of their run: Curved plastic tops, much lighter construction. But the action is a continuation of the last 140B series revisions, except that capstan screw is moved from far end of key to whip above key. Speakers mounted on body, not, as in models of later "A" series, in lid. (This is an easy way to ID.) The five 4th-octave rectangular reed screw plates are retained. Rarest 1st ones, 1968-early 1969, have legs with secondary supports, attached with slots/flanges instead of screws. Legs are now chrome, not wood.4solid
state
yBlack,
Red,
Forest green,
Beige
2 4" x 8" oval
(16 ohm),
on body
2004815985491L (Sept 1974)

Dating to March 13, 1974: http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=8253.0

http://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=6290.0
212031968-09-01
(schematic)
1971 (If replaced by model 203W), Late 1974 (guess)Console, homeHome console version of 200, body similar to 206 and 207. I surmise that the version with 4 8" round speakers has 2 of the speakers facing back for audience (as in 203W). No Pull-out tray nor storage area. Was this discontinued and replaced when 203W was released? I've found no overlap.

4solid
state
yBlack2 4" x 8" oval + 2 8" rnd, or 4 8" rnd2035521755294
222061968-09-01
(schematic)
Late 1974 (guess)Console, studentA common classroom model. These were hooked in series to other 206s and to the teachers' model, the 207. Pull-out tray and storage area.4solid
state
n*Beige (also avocado green?)2 4" x 8" oval (16 ohm) or
2 8" round
2064907985367L
232071968-09-01
(schematic)
1973-06-1
(schematic), Late 1974 (guess)
Console, teacherThe "teacher/instructor" version of the 206. Four groups of 1-to-6 206's can be attached to it, for a total of 24 student units. Pull-out tray and storage area.4solid
state
n*Beige1 6" x 9" oval
or 1 8" rnd
or 2 8" rnd
(all 8 ohm)
20749151 (listed in an early schematic)84135
24106
(set),
106P
(indiv)
1971-06-01
(Schematic,
in standalone manual)
1972-11-07
(Chicago
Electric
Piano Co), or mid-1975 (serial number of a set crosses "A" series, but numbers may not be consecutive.)
Classrooom set,
"Mobile Music
Learning Center"
P = "Pupil"
A rare 44-note classroom model. The 106 is a set of 8 106Ps folded out in single frame. Has a unique (to post-1950s models) single reed bar design, producing greater resonance. Its range is from reed F-9 to C-52.4solid
state
nOrange, Beige1 4" x 8" oval 106
(set),
106P
(indiv)
60001 (according to schematic. These seem to correspond to sets.)87733http://chicagoelectricpiano.com/wurlitzer/wurlitzer-orange-106p/
252141971-06-01
(schematic)
Late 1974 (guess)Console, classroomConsole with wheels. A classroom-marketed variation of seemingly simultaneously-released 203W (below). Has additional tape in/out and phono in. Pull-out tray.4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round2146784580240http://www.ep-service.nl/joomla/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=152&category_id=19&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=3
26203W1971-06-01
(schematic)
Late 1974 (guess)Console, homeVariation of 203. The "W" is apparently for "wheels." Is that the only difference from a later 203? Did it replace 203 or did they exist side by side? Two pairs of larger speakers, one facing back (for audience) and one facing forward. No speakers in upper section. Electronics are unusually easy to remove for regulation (on one I have seen), due to a 9-pin plug. Unlike 214, no pull-out tray.4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round203W71210L75893L
27207V
(208V?)
1973-1-1
(Schematic for
208 Key Note visualizer.)
Late 1974 (guess)Console, teacher207 upgrade, works with "Key Note Visualizer" Model 208. Visualizer manual mentions "208V Communication Electronic Piano"; unclear whether this is quickly amended alt name for 207V piano, or name used for combo of 207V + visualizer.4solid
state
n*Beige2 8" round
(8 ohm)
207V
(208V?)
http://chicagoelectricpiano.com/a-rare-breed-indeed/wulitzer-student-model-classroom/
28214V1973-1-1
(Schematic for
"208V" Key Note visualizer)

^^^^^^^^^^
Late 1974 (guess)Console, classroom214 upgrade, works with "Key Note Visualizer" Model 208.



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
4solid
state
yBlack, green4 8" round214Vhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01--HqC05LY
28.1NOTE: See later in table for Early 1970s German Variants (the 201 and the 300)
28.2200A SeriesEarliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
Notes
No evidence yet of 200A series instruments with assembly completed prior to March 1975.
Reed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
Speakers200A SeriesSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
29200A1974-10-15
(schematic
for 207VA); 1975-03-27 (earliest confirmed key date stamp)
April/May 1983?Professional PortableVisually similar to 200 series, but the amp is completely reworked and improved. Speakers mounted to top, not body--usually. Preamp on reed bar. Reed bar shields covers pickups and reduce hum. Most don't have metal plates on screws of 4th octave up. Late ones have a chrome rear logo.4solid
state
yBlack, dark green2 4" x 8" oval
(usually on
case top.)
200A86509L153020Lhttp://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=6290.0
30206A1974-10-15
(schematic as above)
Mid-1983Console, studentA common classroom model. These were hooked in series to other 206As and to the teachers' model, the 207A (?), 207VA or 205VA. Schematics pair it with "207", too.4solid
state
n* Beige (also avocado green?)2 8" round
(16 ohm)
206A133114Lhttp://chicagoelectricpiano.com/a-rare-breed-indeed/wulitzer-student-model-classroom/
31207A
(?)
1974-10-15
(schematic
for 207VA)
1978Console, teacherExistence distinct from 207VA unconfirmed. Some schematics pair 207 (no A) with 206As. 207A (or at least this name) may have been introduced later, or schematic labeling could have been sloppy.4solid
state
n*Beige2 8" round
(16 ohm)
207A
(?)
http://chicagoelectricpiano.com/a-rare-breed-indeed/wulitzer-student-model-classroom/
32207VA1974-10-15
(schematic
for 207VA)
1978Console, teacherUpgrade for "Key Note Visualizer" Model 208. Are there actually 207As without this feature? 207A disappears from later manual cover & 205VA appears.4solid
state
n*Beige2 8" round
(16 ohm)
207VAhttp://chicagoelectricpiano.com/a-rare-breed-indeed/wulitzer-student-model-classroom/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAXdHFZtvhM
33210
(210A)
1975
(earlier?
later?)
(ebay
claim)
1979
Dec 20 ad,
The Age)
Console, homeThe 200A-amp series equivalent (more or less) to a 203 -- that is, a non-classroom console. 210A is listed on manual cover, but all in existence seem to be 210, no "A" on the actually serial plate. Neither model name is mentioned in any schematic--mysterious! Several in existence (all?) have "214" scribbled in marker on amp rail inside. 210s appear be 214A's
that are slightly modified/simpified for non-classroom use (home, concerts, hotel lounges). Unlike 203W and various 214's, no evidence of version with wheels. In at least one example, there is no Aux Out--it seems they cut corners and simply left off the plate, mounted on the lower front right of a 214A, which contained this and other jacks--though the 214A amp board is used, which has the wiring for a line-level output. 4 speakers as on 214A (below).
4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round
(22.4 ohm)
210
(210A)
101783L101843Lhttp://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=8201.0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lwnXR68yow
34214A1974-10-15 (as above)1982?Console, classroomTwo sets of 8" speakers mounted on each side (front and back-facing). Wheels. Contains mic amp, aux output.4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round214A137443L149247Lhttp://www.ep-service.nl/joomla/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=152&category_id=19&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=3
35214VA1974-10-15
(as above)
1978Console, classroomUpgrade of 214A for "Key Note Visualizer" Model 208.4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round214VAhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01--HqC05LY
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
35.1Late 1970sEarliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
SpeakersLate 1970sSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
362701976-08-30 (date stamp on keybed). 1977-04-04 (Print ad, Argus-Press, MI)1979-05-10 (Print ad, Bulletin Journal, MO)"Butterfly" Baby Grand1976 date stamp and news reports certainly put it in mid-1970s. Late manual lumps it confusingly with 200 (not "A") series, but its amp has unique part # and certainly resembles 200A amp. "Butterfly" design originally used in 1930s-era mini-pianos. Any reports of 1969 vintage appear to be inaccurate.4solid
state
yBrown Mahogany2 8" round270106563L, 112048L127246L
37205VA1979-10-19
(Gopher
Music
Notes)
1980Console, teacherVersion of 207VA for the later "Key Note Visualizer," the V-500.4solid
state
nBeige?2 8" round
(16 ohm)
205VAhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAXdHFZtvhM http://chicagoelectricpiano.com/a-rare-breed-indeed/wulitzer-student-model-classroom/
38215V,
(215VA)
1979
(Gopher
Music
Notes)
1982?
Console, classroomVersion of 214A for the later "Key Note Visualizer," the V-500.4solid
state
yBlack4 8" round215V,
(215VA)
Alphabeck, Wurlitzer Manual PDF
39200B1978-9
(guess); Dec 1980 or Jan 1981 (based on only known serial number)
1981-6-1
(revised
schematic)
Portable, no internal power to speakersBattery powered version of 200A, headphones but no power to internal speakers. Seems to be exceedingly rare.
4solid
state
yBlackDid it have
speakers?
200B146768 (only number known so far)146768 (only number known so far)
39.1Wurlitzer Germany (Hüllhorst) SeriesEarliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
Speakers200A SeriesSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
402011972 or earlier (guess)Sept 1973 or much later (based on serial numbers).Professional PortableA German variation on a 200 with different electronics and slightly different speaker dimensions and brackets. Some examples showing up seem to have extra pots for vibrato speed, and one example has noise gate knobs. These might be aftermarket modules.

Are there other European variants on 200-series Wurlitzers? How about versions for Asia or other continents? No evidence seems to exist, but I would appreciate any and all data.
4solid
state
yBlack2 4" x 9" (or metric, somewhat similar) oval
(ohmage unknown),
on body
2011306xxxx (guess)131xxxxx, 14850782 (very blurry photo).
41300Late 1972 (earlier serial number), January 17 1973 (verified date stamp)1973 (guess)Wood ConsoleA rare console produced only for Europe. Amp looks like a 200 (not 200A). Strange angular "modern" design. Claims of "last model produced" and dating to 1980s, on various websites, are incorrect: Ep-Service.nl has posted a photo of a "January 17, 1973" datestamp).4solid
state
yWood2 4" x 8" oval +
1 8" round
(guess/ photos)
30013060030, 13100164, 13100189https://www.facebook.com/EpServiceSchagen/photos/pcb.1161802393874602/1161800810541427/

photo, Olivier Grall
Ep Forumhttp://ep-forum.com/smf/index.php?topic=3388.0
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
41.1Notable
Access-
ories
Earliest
confirmed
date
yyyy-mm-dd
(source)
Produced
until...
(mostly
guesses)
Model
type
NotesReed
style
AmpVi·
bra·
to
Colors
SpeakersMys-ter-iesSerial numbers - earlier reportedSerial numbers - later reportedQuantity produced-- low hunchQuantity produced-- high hunchLinks
4292019571960s?External
Amplifier
18W amp with
3-speed tremolo control.
Marketed with 120. Since 120 didn't have tremolo (or "vibrato" as they later called it), this feature may have been a selling point.
n/atubeytan12" Concert
Speaker
920
439301962Late 1964External
Amplifier
93(?) W amp. "Tone Cabinet."n/asolid
state
ytan3 6" x 9" ovals930804558804558
44940; (is there a unique 940B, too?)1962 (Introduction of Model 140 EP)Early 1965? (shortly after debut of 140B).Battery Pack for model 140. Mentioned in the original manual for the 140. 140A's (which use the 140 amp) and very early 140B's also have a 7-hole jack for a battery pack, on the phono panel next to the serial plate. (Are the packs for the later 140B amp still called 940's, or are they 940B's?) Not mentioned in the later manual for 140 through 140B electronic pianos, and the plug disappears within the first 2000 serial numbers or less for the 140B. The next battery-powered model is the 200B, much later.

140 owner Tom S remembers the battery pack as having contained four block-shaped lantern batteries. These things are now super-rare, perhaps even extinct. Even photos of a dead specimen would be appreciated.
940
45930Blate 19641968?External
Amplifier
93(?) W amp. "Tone Cabinet."n/asolid
state
ytan3 6" x 9" ovals930B
462081973-1-11978Key Note VisualizerThe first version of the "Key Note Visualizer", attaches to 207V, 214V, 207VA, and 214VA. Visualizer manual mentions "208V Communication Electronic Piano"; unclear whether this is quickly amended alt name for 207V piano, or name used for combo of 207V + visualizer.n/an/an/a208
47V-50019791981Key Note VisualizerThe later version of the "Key Note Visualizer", attaches to 205VA and 215V(A). An online report mentions that coupling/cabling is NOT interchangeable with earlier model.n/an/an/aV-500
48233A1970s1983 (guess)Carry Case (for model 200 Portable)233A
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

If you find this chart useful, please support my research with a contribution. Clicking the golden “Thanks” button below will bring you to a PayPal page, where you can pick an amount you’d like to give.

Some notes:

  • Vibrato: n* While there is no functioning vibrato in any student or teacher models, they are built into the circuitry of the amps in both the 146/146B and 206-era models, and therefore can be added with some minor electronic work.  They are not included in the circuitry of the 206A-era models.
  • October 27, 2016 update:  You can date-confirm your own Wurli!  Please do and send me the data. I had a Eureka moment today, and figured out that, by August 1962 at the latest, all Wurlies had a consistent, cryptic date-stamping system for both the keys, the keybeds (or balance rails) and, later on, the backs of the main rails (where the damper arms and hammers are mounted).  The keybeds will often have a 5-digit code consisting of YMMDD (colors my own.) The keys and main rails will be stamped YMMDDXXX; sometimes a digit at either end will be smudged or faint.  It is not yet clear what those last “X” digits represent (perhaps an inspector/employee code).  The year-digit (Y) doesn’t include the decade; so, a May 23 1974 keybed will be stamped “40523,” with the “4” meaning “1974.”  (I am pretty sure, BTW, that I am the first person to have cracked this date-stamp code among the people currently fixing these things.  If I may toot my own horn.)
  • The very earliest 140’s (and presumably the 145’s and 720’s) used different stamp codes which have not yet been decoded.  Perhaps YWWxxx. (Year, and week of the year.)  Main rails may also have strange, misleading stamps. 2-digit stamps on keybeds may indicate week of the year, as well. (So far, data seems to be consistent with other clues.)
  • This site can help decode dates found on transformers and volume pots.  These will generally predate the stamps found on the wood, but typically only by a few months:  http://www.triodeel.com/eiacode.htm
  • This site counts weeks of years.  Here’s the link for 1962: http://www.epochconverter.com/weeks/1962
  • Since no model of Wurlitzer was produced for more than 10 years, you can use this chart to get a general sense of the period of your model, then use the stamp on your keys and keybed to pinpoint it.  The key stamp date is NOT the assembly date, but probably the date the keys were cut. (Theorized because: Sometimes a single keybed is made from two pieces of wood, each with a different stamp at the transition point).  Still, usually, it is close.  (Sometimes the upper and lower ends of a keyboard have different date stamps, if two pieces of wood were used.) Triangulating using as many date stamps as possible (from keybed/balance rail, keys, transformer, speakers, volume knobs, and amp) will give you a pretty close idea, and usually (not always) the stamps on the wood will be among the latest dates. In one known case, the keys are from 1971 but the keybed is stamped 1973; in another, a very early 200 has a later transformer stamp than the keystamp date, by months; but usually the keys are stamped within a week earlier or later than the keybed.  (If you do send me data, PLEASE include the serial number and model number, including any letters like “A” or “B” or “P,” from the instrument’s badge, and the precise literal stamp numbering, and their locations.  The letters are crucial: a 140B is a different animal than a 140. Photos, pref multiple, are much better, too.)
  • Despite this recent epiphany, this table still contains a lot of guesses, especially regarding dates.  It has been a challenge to pin down months and years of production runs of Wurlitzer electric pianos, and I invite all data you might have. Often I’ve had to go by the dates printed on schematics (which are sometimes revisions, up to 7 years after a model debuted), or on update “note” sheets (sort of updates to the manuals) released by the company–which only indicate that the model existed by a certain date. The pre-200 1960s models (140-145-720 and later A and B variants, and student models 146 and 726, plus B variants) have been especially hard to pinpoint, datewise, though I am on the verge of nailing that down.  Due to my lack of understanding of the company’s manufacturing and distribution system, I also don’t know whether a manufacturing date precedes a model’s debut by weeks or months.  Did they stockpile these, and release them all at once for holiday purchase? or did they push them into shops as quickly as possible?  In the case of the 145B’s, we see a production stamp of April 28, 1964, but an August 17, 1964 memo doesn’t mention them. In all likelihood, they weren’t yet distributed to stores.
  • I’m including columns with some sketchy serial number information, and it is poorly annotated and credited in the chart. Some of this comes from schematics; much of it comes from a very small sampling of keyboards as witnessed by me, or as data shared by compadres, or as recorded in online chat forums, or as seen in online auctions. These should not be taken as “earliest” or “latest” dates, by any means. The columns merely report the earliest and latest numbers I’ve seen, recently, for a given model. These numbers, by the way, do not seem to correspond precisely with the order of production. In periods where several models were produced in parallel, ranges of numbers were reserved for different models. For example, it is possible that 140s started with 25001, while 145’s started at the same time with 30177. A 140B of serial #29808 is from around 1965-6, and therefore post-dates a 1962 145 in the early 30000’s.
  • This table currently lists about 41 Wurlitzer electric piano models, including a mid-60’s teacher model of which I’ve only seen one unverified report (the 147 and/or 147B) and another (the 727 or 727B) of which I am only surmising would have to exist, though not a single report or reference exists. However, the official model numbers only tell part of the story.  Wurlitzer was constantly revising and improving its designs, and there are countless additional variations within many “official” model numbers.  When possible, the factories would use up stock of prior parts on new models, so the official model name change doesn’t always reflect the model’s eventual most distinct features.  Amplifiers were revised repeatedly, and so a 140B, or a 200, or a 200A, might contain different amp specs or designs features at any number of points in its production. (For example, one expert tells me that the 200 had 5 different amps over its 5 years of production; I have not verified this, though the manual shows two variants.)  An early or late 120 will reportedly have different action and amp features; early 140B’s might differ from later ones in their damper arms, reed screws, knob positions, and presence of an optional battery pack.  And so on.
  • I assert that the 200A series did not begin production until late 1974, at the earliest; in fact, date-stamping evidence now seems to be rolling its manufacturing debut into 1975.  Most online accounts have it at 1972.  But I can find no convincing evidence that this is the case, and I think bad data keeps being repeated. I welcome evidence that I am wrong. The earliest dated schematic I can find is from October 1974, and that’s only for the wiring of the new teacher-student modules. Keep in mind that a 1974 instrument might have some electronic parts in it from earlier years (vibrato pots, etc). UPDATE: This link supports my theories. The 200 series was still in production in the first half of 1974. The 200A was still in production in or after April 1983, though that was probably the tail end of things. If you have a 200A series Wurli prior to serial #88659, or later than #153020, I’d be especially interested in any date stamps on its keys or body.
  • What WAS the Wurlitzer used on Ray Charles’ “What’d I Say”?  Everyone likes to think that their 112 or 145 is the one.  Sorry, folks.  Based on photographic evidence from 1958 and 1959, it’s almost certainly a 120.  But if you have a 112, you can still wow people and say it’s the one Sun Ra used on his early singles and albums (““Angels and Demons at Play”, “Super-Sonic Jazz”).  If you have a 140 or 145A or some such, heck, it’s probably the vibrato-y instrument you are hearing on the Sonics’ “Strychnine.”  I’ll take it, and so should you.  More importantly, each of these models had their own distinct sound and feel, with a lot of range and infinite possibilities.  Make it your own.
  • Entries made on chat forums, on Wikipedia, or electronic piano sites, are sometimes contradicted by Wurlitzer’s published data or my individual experience.  On the other hand, those who have opened these instruments up will have access to individual production stamp dates that I have not seen.  So this chart is a mixture of information, misinformation, interpolations and best guesses from all these sources.  Any challenges to attributed claims are not intended as a slam on anyone, but just hopes at confirmation.  It’s a dizzying amount of data; models were often revised mid-run with poor documentation, and we are all, at times, dealing with Frankensteined instruments without knowing it.  Some website entries and articles seem to be written in a quick, top-of-the-head manner, and do not necessarily reflect the depth of repair skill of those who make them.
  • Wurlitzer’s literature has some odd revisionist history.  The 140A-145A-720A-145B, the 146B-147-726B, and the 210/210A, for example, seem to be erased from most of the Wurlitzer literature, manuals, parts catalogs, and schematics, peeking out, at best, only in the graphics of manual covers or in certain update notes.  They most certainly do exist, though–I’ve confirmed all of these, except for the possibly mythical 147 “teacher’s model.”  This chart is very much a work in progress, and I welcome all additional data.
  • My initial impulse in creating this chart was to pinpoint some reed replacement data.  A memo from 1971 spells it all out.  There were four basic reed periods in Wurlitzer Electric Pianos (I’m calling these “styles”), and the reeds are not universally interchangeable between these styles.  Though, what makes things confusing…some are, for the first three styles.  (That said, reports also indicate that, within these “styles,” there are changes over time, perhaps every couple of years.  So, while a 1965-era 140B can use reeds intended for a 1975-era 200A, and vice versa, the instruments’ original reeds may have had different tonal qualities, due to different thicknesses, metal, manufacturing process, etc.)
  • Once we are in the 200-series/1968-and-beyond era, there exist keyboards labeled “Musitronic” which look exactly like Wurlitzers and carry the same model numbers (though different serial number systems).  These were licensed by the Wurlitzer company.  Experts report that, while visually nearly identical, these were manufactured by the Musitronic company under different conditions, and are different in feel and sound.  (Different, perhaps softer hammer felts, etc.) I have worked on one of these, and having no other nearby Wurlitzer EP with which to compare it, I must say it seemed indistinguishable from one. I wonder if at least some of them (or maybe even all of them) were manufactured by Wurlitzer and rebranded; or if the crucial parts were sourced from Wurlitzer, and merely assembled elsewhere.  Or… did matters of quality control — either in the results of factory inspections, or in parts deliberately chosen — affect which EPs were given the rebadge? (This is merely brainstorming conjecture, not borne out by any modern perception of the quality of these keyboards, which seems excellent.)
    Musitronic also sold other music keyboards, “Music Learning Modules,” which were NOT electric pianos, but some sort of electric organ.  These are not addressed in the above chart.

REED Compatibility “STYLES”

As spelled out in “Note #17,” a circular put out by the Wurlitzer company on August 17 1964, and revised in 1971 (reproduced below), the tone-producing reeds found in Wurlitzer Electronic Pianos are not universally interchangeable between models.  There were 4 basic “styles” of reeds; and even those reportedly changed a bit more, over the years and models.  So the styles reflect “interchangeability” or compatibility, not sameness. In the worst cases, an incorrectly-employed reed won’t even fit in the reed bar’s pickup. In less severe cases, the hammer will hit the wrong spot in the reed due to differing strike lines, producing a dull thud instead of a ringing tone.  Within a model, as well, the tongues of the reeds are different widths at certain key points, so (for example) a bass range A#-14 will not fit in the pickup of an F#-22 (in almost any model), even if shortened.  And so on.

In the first three periods, the keyboards shipped with the lead tips of all the reeds facing down.  (It’s common to see otherwise, however, as reeds were frequently flipped upside-down during later tuning.)  Starting with the 140A series, the reeds above #20 (E3) were installed facing up.  The bass reeds (#20 and below) always faced down.  Most technicians report, though, that it is generally OK for the reeds to face differently from what was initially intended.  It can change the pitch of a given note, especially in some early treble reeds with a rapid tapering of the thickness, but it does not usually seem to adversely affect the tonality of the reed. (If the reed is at all bent from use, flipping can make a positive or negative difference.)

It appears that the length of a given reed number/note is a constant throughout the entire run of Wurlitzers.  There may be slight changes in the size or location of the reeds screw holes which would affect “length” clearance of pickups if attempting to use even a width-narrowed style 2 reed in a style 1 Wurlitzer.

CHART: The four main styles of Wurlitzer Electric Piano Reeds.
Please note that the widths are approximate, as there seemed to be a range of tolerances within 1/300 of an inch. Bass reeds can be .151", especially in the later 1950s. Midrange reeds can be .109" to .111". Treble reeds can be .096" to .099". Factors such as rust, dull dies, and my cheap micrometer might explain some of the deviations.

The measurements listed here are not the only factors in reed differences. The width-taper of the tongue can look very different from one style to the next in certain ranges (eventually I will include pictures for comparison). Hardness and springiness of steel seems to be the main difference between the bass ranges in styles 3 and 4. There are different specs to the grinds in different styles, and I do not have measurements or specs on those.
Reed numbersReed Style 1
(110-112A)
Reed Style 2
(120-700)
Reed Style 3
(140-145-720,
no "A" or "B")
Reed Style 4
(140A/B - 145A/B - 720A/B,
all 200 and 200A series)

GrindWidth in InchesGrindWidth in InchesGrindWidth in InchesGrindWidth in Inches
1-14no grind.135no grind.150no grind.150no grind.150
15-20no grind.135no grind.150no grind.125no grind.125
21-42sharp grind.110no grind.120no grind.120gradual grind.120
43-50sharp grind.110sharp grind.110sharp grind.110gradual grind.110
51-58sharp grind.097sharp grind.097sharp grind.097gradual grind.097
59-64sharp grind.097sharp grind.097sharp grind.097sharp grind.097

Reed Style 1: Used in the 110, 111, 112 and 112A models, (1954-circa 1957). (Perhaps in the extremely rare 100 prototype, too?).  The “tongue” on these meets the square base with a very rapid taper outwards (in the width dimension), which may be these reeds have a reputation for frequent breakage.

Suppliers who believe it’s ever OK to use later vintage 120 reeds in these models are misguided….except for the topmost range of #51 to 64. The bass and mid range 120 (style 2) reeds will not fit in the pickups–they are too wide; and even if filed narrower, they will make a dead “thud” on the node of the reed, due to hammer strike-line incompatibility. While the notes in the 43-50 range of Style 2 (below) will clear pickups in the 110-112A models, they are still allegedly incompatible, perhaps due to taper, grind and steel used.

Unfortunately, it’s hard to know what you are getting when buying online in terms of NOS early reeds. Thankfully, as of 2017, Vintage Vibe is manufacturing and selling correct replacement reeds for these.

It is tragic and not uncommon to see pickups in reed bars in the early models that have been filed wide to accommodate later reeds.  This ruins the reed bars, as they can no longer take the correct reeds, and the bad reeds won’t work correctly.

There seems to be some vagueness about the issue of “flatness” or taper of the thickness of these reeds.  The bass reeds (#1-20) are always taperless/grindless/flat in the thickness dimension, and at least by mid-1956 the mid and upper reeds (#21 and above) are ground, so that there is a thickness-taper to them. (The square base is thicker than on the bass reeds).

But are the earliest ones (110, 111) of even thickness all the way up the scale (flat/unground)?  Upper reeds do exist which have this unground/flat quality, but it is unclear whether any models other than the prototype 100 had them installed.  According to Janice at Morelock’s, these experimental reeds “were razor sharp…they’d cut you!”

Reed style 1 uses three blanks: 1-20 (no grind), 21-50 (rapid grind to thin), 51-64 (rapid grind to thin).

Reed Style 2: Used in the 120 and 700 models of 1957 to circa 1961. As stated above, the tongues of these reeds are a little wider below reed #43, which is a problem if installing in the earlier models:  They won’t clear the pickups.  They also taper more gradually to the base (in the width/traceable dimension), especially visible in the bass register, which makes them stronger; but it means that the strike point is moved, and the hammers of the earlier models will tend to “thud” on the nodal points of reeds, making them sound dead if installed in the earlier models. (Especially bad around 21-26, F3-Bb3).  The reeds are now unground (flat) going all the way up to reed #42 (unlike style 1, which has reeds 21-42 ground).  The top notes, #51 to 64 are compatible with Style 1.

Again: The reeds of this era should be grindless –no thickness-to-thinness taper– on all notes below D#-43.  It is extremely common to see Reed Style 4 reeds substituted in the #21 to #42 range, since they will clear the pickups and they were more available from suppliers.  If there is any thickness taper, I contend that they are the “wrong” reeds, though perhaps fixes were made to mitigate their less-than-perfect specs (unknown).  Sometimes this will matter; sometimes, if the hammer is set right, one can get away with it. (This situation applies to Reed Style 3 situations, too, as they are similar/identical to Style 2 from #21 up.)

Reed style 2 uses four blanks: 1-20 (no grind), 21-42 (no grind), 43-50 (rapid grind to thin), 51-64 (rapid grind to thin).

These reeds originally had no “chamfer,” or corner notch, in the back of the reed.  It is not uncommon to find notched reeds in a style-2-or-3 Wurlitzer.  Morelock’s claims these are later, correct reeds that were simply manufactured at a different reed factory.  That is a legitimate possibility.  But again, if you find a chamfered reed in the 21-42 range with a change in thickness, or simply one that thuds, it is likely to be an incompatible, Style 4 reed.

Reed Style 3: Used only on the 140, 145 and 720 models of 1962-early 1963. (not to be confused with the later “A” and “B” models associated with these numbers).  It appears that the only change (or incompatibility) from Style 2 is in the bass range, notes #1 (A1) through 20 (E3): They have a visibly more gradual width taper/trace.  The (upper) bass reeds actually look very similar to the Style 4 bass reeds, so their difference is unclear: It could be in the flexibility of the metal.   If there is any manufacturing change above #20, the middle and high reeds are at least compatible with Style 2 (notes 21-50, F3-A#5).  As in Style 2, the top range of notes 51-64 (B5 to C7) are compatible with Style 1.   One of our major contemporary repair shops conflated Style 2 and Style 3 until 2015, which may mean that the bass range differences are not very significant; though Wurlitzer implied that they were important enough, in their “Note #17” memos of 1964 and 1971. In all likelihood, the tips of these reeds pointed down over the entire range, as in the earlier models.

Reed style 3 uses five blanks: 1-14 (no grind), 15-20 (no grind, different shape taper), 21-42 (no grind), 43-50 (rapid grind to thin), 51-64 (rapid grind to thin).

Certain vendors seems to sell Reed style 3 bass reeds for use in 120 electric pianos.  It may be that at some point Wurlitzer did, too. This is incorrect, and these reeds will play wrong.

Reed Style 4: Used for 140A&B/145A&B/720A&B series, 146(B)/726(B) classroom series, 200 series and 200A series (including 106P, 200B and 300).  As this includes all models from mid-1963 through 1983, these are both the most frequently-needed and the easiest to replace, as a market has sustained their re-manufacture.  While the reeds reportedly did change over this long era, perhaps even every couple of years, the Wurlitzer company did not consider the changes significant enough to discourage substitutions.  Nonetheless, when possible or convenient, it’s probably best to use replacement reeds that correspond to your particular model.

Specifically, Vintage Vibe and others report that the reeds from 1975 on, starting with the 200A series, were different: significantly thicker, producing a mellower sound.  I have to admit that I have not really noticed this to be the case, but I rarely get the opportunity to play two different period Wurlitzers side by side.  I find plenty of deviation between any two instruments from any one era; and at this point, many Wurli’s have had enough reeds replaced that it is hard to know if I am listening to an electric piano playing at its original specs.  But one could argue that there is a Reed Style 5 for the post-1975 Wurlitzers.

Reed style 4 uses five blanks, with the top blank ground two different ways (totaling 6 distinct reed shapes): 1-14 (no grind), 15-20 (no grind, different shape taper), 21-42 (gradual grind), 43-50 (gradual grind), 51-58 (gradual grind), 59-64 (rapid grind to thin).

Reed style 4 usually have a “chamfer” corner notch in reeds from 21 up–this reflects manufacture at a different factory. In the earliest 140 “A” series, all the reeds, then eventually only the top 6 reeds, look superficially different (no chamfer notch), but are the same specs as the later reeds.  I am not entirely sure what makes the top 6 reeds incompatible with prior models, as the specs seem superficially similar.  It would be interesting to test them.

Reed length: The shapes, widths, thicknesses, grinds, and steel formulas used shifted over time, but one thing remained standard:  Reed length.  Reed #1 is always 2 and 19/20 of an inch long.  The length of the reeds decrease linearly, each 1/20 of an inch shorter, until reed #20, which is two inches long. At this point, the scaling of the length changes. Starting with # 21, which is 1 43/44 inch, each reed is 1/44 inch shorter until the highest and shortest, which is 1 inch long. A consistently linear decrease.

Important: Although this memo implies that reed #52 signals the change point upwards for interchangeability in Styles 1 to 3, the tongue width actually narrows at reed #51 instead, starting in Style 1 and seemingly retained going forward (even in Style 4).  I am convinced that this was a 1964 printing error that was replicated in 1971.

17

List 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 by Steve Espinola. Please do not republish or repost this list in this form without attribution. Much of its contents are derivative (and attributed to their sources by links), and obviously I make no claims to such contents. It took me many full days of work, over years, to research, edit and organize all this information into this page. It involved hundreds of creative and editorial choices. I’m very happy to share; just do me the courtesy of being in touch and crediting my research and organizational efforts, much as I have credited others in my links.

Especially useful in beginning this list, and frequently cited throughout, was Chris Carroll’s essay about the history of Wurlitzer Electronic Piano models which appeared on the Vintage Vibe website, but now appears to have been removed.  Also helpful was this blog post on their site about reed history, though it contains some serious typos and errors as of November 2017.

Special thanks to Fred DiLeone (Fred’s email here), the Electric Piano Forum, the Sound and Circuit site, The Yahoo Wurlitzer Electric Piano List, Tim Warneck of Retrolinear, Ken Rich Sound Services, Janice of Morelock’s Organ Parts, Olivier Grall’s Wurlitzer page, and the Chicago Electric Piano Company blog, all of which I used as resources in developing this list. I hope, in return, it can function as a useful quick reference to all of them and others.

41 comments on “Wurlitzer Electric Piano models: a list.
  1. clayton J duplessis says:

    Have a Wurlitzer 145B Serial NBR 33434 was in the attic for many years.

    When you turn it on the speaker is vary noisy is this worth restoring

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Yes, it certainly is worth restoring. Please call me at 347-374-0428 and let’s talk. –Steve

  2. Mike Loera says:

    I just bought a Wurlitzer upright piano with the serial number 378526 on the back and inside plate but I cant find that on any piano listing sites. Does anyone know what year this piano was built and how much it is worth?

  3. Jason Betsill says:

    I have a Wurlitzer EP388, I can find absolutely nothing on it, can someone help me learn something about its origins, year made and value??????

  4. B.J. Major says:

    The 210 model was most definitely made before 1975. I know this because my mother owned one and she got it in 1971.

    • Paleophone says:

      This is interesting, but it doesn’t match any data of mine. Are you sure it wasn’t a 203, 203W, or 214? They look very similar. Does she still have it? We could check the date stamps, and I would love to.

  5. Darryl Nelson says:

    Bought a Wurlitzer 200A student electric piano at the thrift store for ten bucks,.. only thing that was wrong was a bunch of coins stuck between the keys jamming them.. works great..

  6. Nickey Spano says:

    My Wurlitzer was purchased in 1970 or 71
    It needs to be repaired and totally gone over.I losses the ac. cord I haven’t played it for years I live in Nass. County and could drop it off. I want to find out if it can be repaired.I would need an estimate on repairs to determine if it is worth fixing.My name is Nick

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Always best to call me! Messages left on this page get lost in the shuffle. I am so very happy to help if I can. 347-374-0428.

  7. Max says:

    I have a 140B #51014. Great sound and in great condition!

    • Steve Espinola says:

      That is BY FAR the latest serial number I have seen on a 140B. I want pix and all sorts of date stamps, pronto.

  8. Tim Fleming says:

    Trying to figure out how to value a Model 112 that according to the date on the inside is 1957. Has all the parts including floor pedal and plug. Has all the legs and is stable. Works but some keys stick.

  9. Paul Groff says:

    Hi,

    I just picked up a Wurlitzer Model 200, SN 82911 L (Logan Utah?). Internally stamped in green ink on back of action: 40325302 “A-60-5” (including the quotation marks). According to your dating idea, this may be from 1974, March 25 (so later than the last number you listed above for a model 200). Definitely a Model 200 with speakers on the chassis and the Model 200 amp.

    This one has been played a good bit (based on some looseness in the action) but the body seems almost too clean to be original. Amp looks original. So let me know if there are any pics or details you’d like.

  10. Arthur Webb says:

    I own a 145A that could not be in better original playing condition internally. I will post serial number and any date stamps when I get home. The only issue is the ground buzz, that no matter what methods we (the pros I take it to for servicing at custom vintage keyboards here in los angeles) attempt at permanently reducing it to a level that is acceptable for studio recording, just cant quite get it eliminated enough. I understand that theres going to be a buzz on this particular model especially no matter what we do, but any ideas or input on how to most tame this notorious thorn in my side would be greatly appreciated!

  11. Armin says:

    I have a 200B. It has no speakers and no tremolo. Instead of the tremolo knob it has a headphone volume knob.

  12. Bruce says:

    What was the Wurly that had 4 student models built into one cabinet facing each other. Very bizarre.

    • Steve Espinola says:

      I think you are thinking of a Musitronic Learning System MKS-470, which wasn’t actually manufactured by Wurlitzer, though it is often falsely described as a bunch of Wurlitzer electric pianos. Those are 6 organs or synths in one body, with a hinge in the middle. There is, however, an early 1970s Wurlitzer system with a set of 8 44-key pianos that are linked together. This is the 106P. Similar look, but less bizarre.

  13. Frank Swart says:

    I’m looking for a power cable for a Wurlitzer 700. The two prong type. Do you have one?

    Thanks!

    • Steve Espinola says:

      I do not. There is certainly a demand for them. They are a standard appliance cable of that era. You may have luck calling a guitar amp store.

      Eventually you will want that two prong output upgraded to a three prong. Safer.

  14. Eric Porterfield says:

    Does anyone know how many 111’s were made. I have one in very good shape. No broken parts. Only needs the F2 and F4 reed. Can’t find much.

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Not many were made at all. The lowest serial number I know is 1298. The highest is 1503. And there are even some 112’s with lower serial numbers, though most of those seem to start in the 5000’s.

      I’m going to guess that there may have been as few as 1500 instruments ever made of 110’s and 111’s, combined. They are super rare.

      This data is subject to change, if suddenly some show up with serial numbers in the 4000’s, or something. There seems to be a big serial number gap.

  15. gwen says:

    I have a 1926 Wulritzer serial number#——-in fair condition. What’s it worth? Any reason that I should hold on to it. No one plays it now but it still sounds great!

    • Steve Espinola says:

      I think you must be talking about a standard Wurlitzer piano, or perhaps a Wurlitzer Electric Player Piano (which would have used paper rolls with songs programmed into them). This page is only about the electro-acoustic instruments, usually 64-notes, that Wurlitzer produced from 1954 to 1983.

      You should hold onto yours if it brings you joy!

  16. Monte Hinson says:

    I just acquired a Wurlitzer 112 ser # 1331. when powered up it has a loud hum and nothing else. It is in relatively good condition with the original power cord/ pedal etc. Not a keyboard player myself so I will be passing it along at some point. Would like to know more about it. Any info or input would be greatly appreciated. Monte

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Great chatting by phone! Sounds like you have a great piece there. Someone in NC will be very happy.

  17. Terrri Hayea says:

    Hi
    I found your site (love it) when I resumed my search for a cord for my
    1958 Wurlitzer Electric Piano I started my search in 2013,
    with no success. I have owned it since 1990 hope you can help
    it is model # 120 brown with petal and it is metal on top
    serial # (w? may me a stain )(the numbers are clear 6955), 115 volts, 60 watt, 0.6 amp
    cyc 60, (Corinth Mississippi) is on the tag on the rear panel

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Hi Terri,

      The cables on those old Wurlies are pretty standard appliance cables from that era. I do not have a reliable source for them, but you may be able to find a modern substitute online.

      For safety’s sake, however, it’s usually a good idea to get an amp tech to rewire those old amps to 3-prong, and to take out a rather dangerous capacitor they tended to wire in near the power source. (not my area of expertise, but any shop that repairs guitar tube amps will know how to do it).

      I can direct you to a good tech to do this work.

  18. cinnamonrolli says:

    Hello,

    great website! I will use this as a guide in my searches!

    I have a 146B and didn’t see it on your list.
    It is a solid state. I can take pictures if need be. I am not sure if it has the tremolo circuity or not but I plan on converting it to 140B specs one day soon.

    • Steve Espinola says:

      cinnamonrolli! Nice to see you here! I’m sorry, your comment was buried, til now, in miles of spam.

      That information is extremely helpful. Thank you! I’m always happy to receive pictures. From what I’ve read, the circuitry is probably there, just not hooked up.

      I am unclear on whether there was ever a 146 (no B), or whether they introduced these teaching modules around the times of the “B’s”. The official Wurlitzer literature is EXTREMELY vague or downright sloppy in differentiating the various early 60s models. The 140A/145A/145B/720A models are only EVER mentioned in notes about reed compatibility–the appropriate manual “disappears” them. Likewise, that note #17 makes no mention of a 146B, or the teacher model 147.

  19. Bill Vosteen says:

    Good information. Does anyone have any idea of how many of each model were produced over the years? They have a pretty good handle on the numbers of old Gibson and Fender guitars, the numbers of Wurly’s would be interesting.

    Thanks,

    Bill

    • Steve Espinola says:

      Someone may know, but I don’t. Do the serial numbers give us an accurate count? I have no idea. It would be interesting to know how many still survive. I think tons of them were tossed. It’s still happening, too. I hear horror stories.

    • Steve Espinola says:

      I’m continuing to pursue this question. It’s a really good one. I get the feeling that, from around 1957 through 1967, they were producing around 3000 electric pianos a year, and these were divided, roughly, between whichever models were being produced in a given year. I’m basing this on serial numbers, and a rough idea of when certain individual instruments were made. I don’t know whether production increased dramatically, starting with the 200 series, in 1968. I’m guessing it did, but I have not analyzed the data.

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